Hazard Perception Test - What You Should Know

Written by Omid Karimi

Part of safe driving is knowing how to spot any potential hazards while being behind the wheel. That is why the Queensland Department of Transport and Main Roads has updated its hazard perception test (HPT). With the new HPT, all learner licence holders are required to pass the test before upgrading their licence. This change has also helped improve the quality of the test clips with new computer-genherated images.

Before you can take the hazard perception test, you must have held your learner licence for at least 6 months. It will take 15-30 minutes to complete the test.

Who can take the test?

  • Learner licence holders who have held their learner's licence for at least 6 months 
  • P1 licence holders who have held their licence for at least 12 months

How to enrol?

You must hold a valid licence (not expired, suspended, surrendered, or cancelled). You must renew your licence otherwise.

  • Log in if you already have an account. Or Sign up for an account. Input your email address and password - write a note if you want to make sure you don't forget your account details.
  • Enter your customer details. You will need your driver's licence number for this.
  • Enrol and pay. The cost for the test is $37.70 and you can pay the test fee via credit card.

The hazard perception test is designed to determine your capability to identify possible hazards from an everyday act. You can pass the exam based on a computer analysis of the time it took you to react to different situations. Unlike the theory exam which is a Q and A test, and has right or wrong answers. You have to click as soon as you can when you see a potential hazard and again when it's a definite one. But avoid having too many clicks as this will mean a zero score for you.

Knowing what constitutes a hazard is worth keeping in mind while taking the test. Remember what you learned from your theory test and apply it when you take your hazard perception test. Review the road rules and practice as much as you can. 

There are plenty of mock hazard perception tests you can find online. Doing a mock test will help you get a feel of what to expect from the hazard perception test. It might be confusing when you need to click on your mouse. 

The sooner you click on a possible hazard the higher your score is. It can be frustrating when you fail on the first try, but go ahead and try again. You will start to understand the timing and what you should look out for. And it will make a huge difference in the actual test.

Here's what you should remember when doing a hazard perception test:

  1. Don't scan frantically for driving errors. Immerse yourself as if you're driving in real life and determine how you'd respond to the scenario.
  2. Look further ahead of your vehicle so you can identify hazards before they become a problem.
  3. Be careful of the road markings.

You can increase your chances of passing the hazard perception test by booking a few driving lessons before your test. This way, everything you learned is fresh from your memory. And lastly, relax and take a deep breath before taking the test. Just focus on the scenarios and imagine what you should do if you're in that situation.

Do hazard perception tests expire?

No. Hazard perception tests don’t expire. Once you pass a hazard perception test, you don’t have to do it anymore.

Do international licence holders need to take the hazard perception test?

If your international licence is still valid and you want to get your Australian drivers licence, you don’t have to take the hazard perception test. You only need to pass the written test and then practical test. After passing the practical test, you will get your Australian driver licence.

If your international driver licence is expired, then you need to apply for a learners licence. You need to pass the written test first to be able to get your Learners licence. Then before trying the practical test, you need to make sure you pass the hazard perception test. 

If you are not quite sure about how the whole process goes and how much it will cost you to get your Australian licence, read our article on ‘Overseas Licence Conversion’.

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